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New York Times: Accept 50.000 Syrian refugees to rebuild Detroit city

New York Times: Accept 50.000 Syrian refugees to rebuild Detroit cityimage

18 May 2015

“New York Times” published an article by American researchers called the US administration to receive 50 thousand Syrian refugees and housed them in the city of Detroit in Michigan aiming to rebuild this city, which lost much of its importance.

Mark Ghr and David Leighton, a political science professor at Stanford University (California), and former president of the New York City Commission for the development of housing, they wrote “The Syrian refugees is an ideal group to achieve this goal, specially that Arab Americans have showed remarkable presence in Detroit”, and they said that the city is located north of the United States “in the past was a large city, and today has become an empty urban”. The authors said, “Imagine if a positive result from these social and humanitarian disasters”.

As well as the number of refugees fleeing growing from the war in Syria, including about 1.8 million in Turkey, and about 600 thousand in Jordan.

Although it does not seem realistic, the authors also establish their thesis on proposal by the Republican governor of Michigan, Rick Sindar, who called in January 2014 to receive 50 thousand refugees “to revive the” Detroit.

The authors felt that the “resettlement of Syrians in Detroit will need to commitment and cooperation at various levels within the government, but it is quite possible”, and they noted that President Barack Obama, should “raise the annual ceiling for the reception of refugees to 50 thousand,” and the allocation of $ 1.5 billion for it.

Having been forced to declare bankruptcy in the summer of 2013, Detroit eliminated in January 2015 after a long judicial process and scheduling of its debt, which was $ 18 billion.

Detroit, the historic capital of the US auto industry, which has suffered difficulties in recent years, now it become home to 700.000 people after that it includes 1.9 million people in 1950, and currently it has about 70 thousand neglected building.

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